Eric Arthur Blair, better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. His work is marked by keen intelligence and wit, a profound awareness of social injustice, an intense opposition to totalitarianism, a passion for clarity in language, and a belief in democratic socialism.

In addition to his literary career Orwell served as a police officer with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma from 1922-1927 and fought with the Republicans in the Spanish Civil War from 1936-1937. Orwell was severely wounded when he was shot through his throat. Later the organization that he had joined when he joined the Republican cause, The Workers Party of Marxist Unification (POUM), was painted by the pro-Soviet Communists as a Trotskyist organization (Trotsky was Joseph Stalin’s enemy) and disbanded. Orwell and his wife were accused of “rabid Trotskyism” and tried in absentia in Barcelona, along with other leaders of the POUM, in 1938. However by then they had escaped from Spain and returned to England.

Between 1941 and 1943, Orwell worked on propaganda for the BBC. In 1943, he became literary editor of the Tribune, a weekly left-wing magazine. He was a prolific polemical journalist, article writer, literary critic, reviewer, poet and writer of fiction, and, considered perhaps the twentieth century’s best chronicler of English culture.

Orwell is best known for the dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four (published in 1949) and the satirical novella Animal Farm (1945) — they have together sold more copies than any two books by any other twentieth-century author. His 1938 book Homage to Catalonia, an account of his experiences as a volunteer on the Republican side during the Spanish Civil War, together with numerous essays on politics, literature, language, and culture, are widely acclaimed.

Orwell’s influence on contemporary culture, popular and political, continues decades after his death. Several of his neologisms, along with the term “Orwellian” — now a byword for any oppressive or manipulative social phenomenon opposed to a free society — have entered the vernacular.

In the face of pain there are no heroes.

— George Orwell, 1984

If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.

— George Orwell

If you loved someone, you loved him, and when you had nothing else to give, you still gave him love.

— George Orwell, 1984

The best books… are those that tell you what you know already.

— George Orwell, 1984

Doublethink means the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one’s mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them.

— George Orwell, 1984

If you want to keep a secret, you must also hide it from yourself.

— George Orwell, 1984

We shall meet in the place where there is no darkness.

— George Orwell, 1984

Every generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one that went before it, and wiser than the one that comes after it.

— George Orwell

Big Brother is Watching You.

— George Orwell, 1

Perhaps a lunatic was simply a minority of one.

— George Orwell, 1984

All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.

— George Orwell, Animal Farm

The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.

— George Orwell, Animal Farm

But if thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought.

— George Orwell, 1984

Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past.

— George Orwell, 1984

If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face—for ever.

— George Orwell, 1984

It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.

— George Orwell, 1984

Until they become conscious they will never rebel, and until after they have rebelled they cannot become conscious.

— George Orwell, 1984

In a time of deceit telling the truth is a revolutionary act.

— George Orwell

War is peace.
Freedom is slavery.
Ignorance is strength.

— George Orwell, 1984

Perhaps one did not want to be loved so much as to be understood.

— George Orwell, 1984

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